Publish All Content Immediately vs. Drip Feed Over Time? The $1 Million Question

Release the hounds

Why do tomorrow what you can do today?

I think I have it wrong.

It goes “why do today what you can put off to tomorrow?”

I prefer the first version. Let’s go with that.

I’m not much of a procrastinator.

Combine that with my severely lacking perfectionist tendencies and you end up with someone who belches stuff out the door that’s littered with mistakes.

I know that about me but I have no intention of changing.

I’m okay with mistakes. Read Fatstacksblog.com and you’ll find tons of them.

My websites verge on sloppy.

But if you can overlook the lack of polish, it’s good stuff. Yeah, I’m tooting my own horn because I know good from bad. Fatstacksblog is the “how to blog” site I would want to read.

Sadly Chris Rempel (formerly the Lazy Marketer) doesn’t blog as often as he used to. He has my vote as best IM blogger EVER. He publishes blog posts once in a while here.

It’s the same with my niche sites. They’re not pretty. The paint is peeling a tad. Needs new carpet and light fixtures. But the bones are good.

What does that mean?

It means my sites are not the prettiest. Surely not without typos. It definitely has content that needs improving. But overall, the content is solid. Some articles are epic.

IMO small prices to pay to get stuff done.

If you sweat the small stuff outsourcing might drive you crazy. People make mistakes. The more people involved, the more mistakes made.

And that’s the long-in-the-tooth lead-in to today’s topic which is:

Should you publish everything you have immediately or drip-feed it?

Short answer: Publish it all immediately.

Long answer: It depends.

The default rule for me is to publish as much content as quickly as humanly possible.

REMEMBER: Unpublished content does NOT generate revenue.

Now to the long answer, which is it depends.

It depends on your site.

The bigger your loyal audience, the stronger argument there is for drip-feeding. Fatstacks falls in to this type of site.

You might tolerate an email or blog post once per day but if I blasted out 18 different blog posts in one day, you probably wouldn’t read them all. If I drip feed the 18 articles/emails over 18 days, chances are you’ll read them.

Contrast that with a site that derives most traffic from search.

If you crank out 50 articles in one day, nobody cares. Visitors show up via search, read what they want and disappear (hopefully via a click on an ad).

But doesn’t Google like fresh content? If so, isn’t it better to drip feed fresh content in the long run?

It’s amazing how SEO gets so twisted. I have no idea who came up with the fresh content requirement and maybe there’s a hint of truth to it, but it’s been blown way out of proportion.

Let’s say you have a site plan for 200 articles. Do you really think Google prefers that you drip feed the 200 articles over 200 days versus publishing all 200 on day 1?

I don’t think so. It makes no sense.

If you drip feed and publish nothing after the 200, you run out of fresh content anyway AND delay your rankings.

If you plan on publishing more than 200 articles in the long run, you serve the “fresh content” requirement (if it exists) regardless of which approach you take.

If you sledgehammer the Web with 200 articles at once, it gives you a good opportunity to interlink it properly. I love publishing entire article series at one time because the interlinking gets done right away. One and done.

The ONLY argument in favor of drip feed is to serve a regular readership. I actually do have 5 more articles ready to go for this email newsletter and a few more in progress. As much as I’d love to release the hounds all at once, I exercise restraint because I’m publishing for regular readers.

Yesterday I blasted 15 articles out the door on one niche. There was no sane reason to delay.

Drip feeding content is like dripping out invoices to people that owe you money.

Yeah, crazy, right? Who on earth drips out invoices?

Rule number one in business is to get paid as fast as humanly possible. Cash flow keeps the lights on.

Unpublished content does not earn revenue.



Leave a Comment